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grupaok:

Dan Flavin, Untitled (For Elizabeth and Richard Koshalek), 1971 — installation view, Works for New Spaces, Walker Art Center, 1971

grupaok:

Dan Flavin, Untitled (For Elizabeth and Richard Koshalek), 1971 — installation view, Works for New Spaces, Walker Art Center, 1971


(via grupaok)
nickdrake:

Patti.

nickdrake:

Patti.


(via dalatdesigns)
nevver:

Gabriel García Márquez, RIP

nevver:

Gabriel García Márquez, RIP


(via nevver)
nprbooks:

Latin American author Gabriel Garcia Marquez, who won the Nobel Prize in literature in 1982, died Thursday. He was 87. Garcia Marquez, the master of a style known as magic realism, was and remains Latin America’s best-known writer.
His novels were filled with miraculous and enchanting events and characters; love and madness; wars, politics, dreams and death. And everything he had written, Garcia Marquez once said, he knew or heard before he was 8 years old.
Chilean novelist Ariel Dorfman says Marquez’s Nobel Prize acceptance speech was one of the author’s most important messages to the world.
"Garcia Marquez is speaking about all the people who are marginal to history, who have not had a voice," Dorfman says. "He gives a voice to all those who died. He gives a voice to all those who are not born yet. He gives a voice to Latin America."
Read our full appreciation here.
Image via See Colombia

nprbooks:

Latin American author Gabriel Garcia Marquez, who won the Nobel Prize in literature in 1982, died Thursday. He was 87. Garcia Marquez, the master of a style known as magic realism, was and remains Latin America’s best-known writer.

His novels were filled with miraculous and enchanting events and characters; love and madness; wars, politics, dreams and death. And everything he had written, Garcia Marquez once said, he knew or heard before he was 8 years old.

Chilean novelist Ariel Dorfman says Marquez’s Nobel Prize acceptance speech was one of the author’s most important messages to the world.

"Garcia Marquez is speaking about all the people who are marginal to history, who have not had a voice," Dorfman says. "He gives a voice to all those who died. He gives a voice to all those who are not born yet. He gives a voice to Latin America."

Read our full appreciation here.

Image via See Colombia


(via nprbooks)
fyeahwomenartists:

Geta Brătescu
Costumes for Ephemeral Celebrations (1987)
Tempera Color on Paper

fyeahwomenartists:

Geta Brătescu

Costumes for Ephemeral Celebrations (1987)

Tempera Color on Paper


(via fyeahwomenartists)
greatartinuglyrooms:

Helen Frankenthaler
grupaok:

Martin Soto Climent, Wild Guest, 2009
nevver:

The man who fell the Earth

(via art21)

art21:

"A work of art doesn’t have to be explained. If you do not have any feeling about this, I cannot explain it to you. If this doesn’t touch you, I have failed." —Louise Bourgeois

Looking back at Louise Bourgeois's Helping Hands (1993–96), relocated from Chicago’s Jane Addams Memorial Park to Chicago Women’s Park in 2011, and featured in Art21’s 2001 Identity episode.

WATCH: Louise Bourgeois in Identity [available in the U.S. only] | Additional videos

IMAGES: Production stills from the Art in the Twenty-First Century Season 1 episode, Identity, 2001. © Art21, Inc. 2001.

fyeahwomenartists:

Sheila Hicks in 1964 from Weaving As Metaphor

fyeahwomenartists:

Sheila Hicks in 1964 from Weaving As Metaphor


(via fyeahwomenartists)